Stephen Shore

May 18, 2009
Stephen Shore

Stephen Shore

“A picture happens when something inside connects, an experience that changes as the photographer does” – Stephan Shore

Stephen Shore  is said to be known for his “deadpan” images which means generally no expression, he takes pictures mostly of dead objects or scenery in the United States of America, and almost brings them to life with his use of colour and camera angle.  Shore is also highly applauded for his use of originality in colour in art photography. Stephen Shore self-taught him self as a young child and was interested in photography from a young age.

By Stephen Shore

By Stephen Shore

 In this image Shore gives us depth and a real life atmosphere to make viewers feel as if they are in the photograph.

Kripple Bush- Stephen Shore

Kripple Bush- Stephen Shore

 This photographic image is beautiful and pleasing to the eye, it makes me want to be there. It is an unusual concept of a man made pool (something you would have in a built-up area) and the countryside (a very organic land), but they gel together well with the time of day the photo was taken and the perfect weather. Shore has played with colours once again matching the colour of the sky with the luxurious colour of the water, with a horizon line (the trees) as a separation.  

Shore’s photographs are real and give a slight sense of nostalgia they are all around quite pleasurable.

http://www.masters-of-fine-art-photography.com/02/artphotogallery/photographers/stephen_shore_01.html

http://www.masters-of-photography.com/S/shore/shore.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_Shore


Sam Taylor Wood

May 18, 2009
Sam Taylor Wood

Sam Taylor Wood

Sam Taylor-Wood identified as being part of the Young British Artist society is an English conceptual artist known as the “escape” artist based on her recent work, her use of simplicity is what gives her work impact. She explores the physical and emotional boundary’s of human beings, states of body form. The other thing about Sam Taylor-Woods work is that she can display emotions through her photographs, emotions of pleasure and desolation,  emotional release.

sam-taylor-wood-one1

Self Portrait Falling- Sam Tayor Wood

sam-taylor-wood-three1

Self Portrait suspended- Sam Taylor Wood

 These three self portraits allow Taylor-Wood to adopted the emotion and body-form she wants her pictures to communicate, they are gravitational but weightless and they express a great sense of release.

Self Portrait suspended- Sam Taylor Wood

Self Portrait suspended- Sam Taylor Wood

The object in the photos are aligned in the center (the main focus) and there placed in a freshlighted background, which helps with the atmosphere that is trying to be conveyed.

The two images that cought my eye is the photos of a woman being suspended by ballons, they are shot in a dark room with slight lighting on the floor. Her body is suspended like a ragdoll and she looks so waightless it’s as though she is flying. Again there is a great sence of release.

Ballon- Sam Taylor Wood

Ballon- Sam Taylor Wood Ballon- Sam Taylor Wood

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sam_Taylor-Wood

A Vogue issue- Sam Taylor Wood interview

http://www.whitecube.com/artists/taylorwood/


Robert Frank

May 18, 2009
Robert Frank

Robert Frank

“When people look at my pictures I want them to feel the way they do when they want to read a line of a poem twice.”-quote Robert Frank

This Quote is from a man called Robert Frank an important figure in American photography and film. Frank’s most famous work was a photographic book named “The Americans” made in 1958. He liked to experiment with compositing and manipulating photographs  then in his later days Frank  moved on to making films.

Untited By- Robert Frank

Untited By- Robert Frank

This is one of Robert Franks images from his book “The Americans” toke somewhere in America in the 1950’s. The young woman in the photograph is unknown and in the book this certain picture has no captions. The image set in a cafe is taken as if Frank himself is standing behind the counter observing  the young woman, she has dark hair and is quite a bold object in the picture and even though you are draw to her face at first glance the advertising signs behind her head are very distracting. The wall hanging of Santa in the background almost echo the woman’s face which brings a slight humour to the photograph.  Robert Frank’s
The Americans-by Robert Frank